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Just diagnosed with stomach cancer: My House

How can I tell my family that I have stomach cancer?

For some people, telling friends and family that they have cancer is as scary as hearing the news themselves. You may be worried about how people are going to react or about how they will treat you. The choice to tell people or not is yours alone. If you choose to tell people, here are some tips:

  • Be open and honest, and let them know it is okay to be the same with you
  • Tell them at a time when you can give them your full attention. If you don't feel up to talking, that is okay
  • If someone reacts badly, it's not your fault. Each person will react in his or her own way

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.


How can I learn to cope with my diagnosis?

How you cope with cancer might be different each day. Give yourself time, but know that learning to cope can help you move forward with treatment. Consider these tips:

  • Try to keep doing activities or hobbies if you can. This may help you take your focus off cancer for a while
  • Join a support group where you can talk with other people who are also learning to cope with cancer
  • Learn as much as you can about your cancer and treatment options so you can be involved in your care

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.


I am getting a lot of information. How can I keep it all organized?

With all the office visits, appointments, doctors, and paperwork you now have, it is important to stay organized. Taking a few minutes to make a system to organize all of the information may help you feel more in control. Here are a few tips that may help:

  • If organizing is not your strength, ask a loved one or care partner for help
  • Set aside a special place in your house for only this information
  • Use a planner to track appointments and hold papers that are just for cancer information

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.


What if I, as a care partner, need support?

As a care partner, you should know that staying strong can help your loved one with cancer stay strong. When supporting someone with cancer, remember that it is okay to:

  • Consider taking a break; you need rest too
  • Let others help; you don't have to do it all
  • Reach out to other care partners or loved ones of those with cancer for support and strength

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.


How can I, or the person I care about, eat well during treatment?

Eating well during treatment is very important. It can help you or the person you care about feel better before, during, and after treatment. But making healthy food choices can be hard during treatment for many reasons. This may be especially true for people with cancers of the digestive system, such as pancreatic, colon, or stomach cancer. For these types of cancer, surgery may be needed that may affect how you eat or drink. Other treatments, such as chemotherapy, can also have side effects that may cause eating or GI (gastrointestinal) problems. Your healthcare provider can refer you to resources and people, such as an oncology dietitian, that can help you learn tips for healthy eating during treatment. He or she can also help you make a meal plan that works for you.

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.


What do I need to think about when working during treatment?

Working during cancer treatment is a personal choice. You may find that what and how much you do may need to change based on how you feel. You may be wondering about many things, such as how to tell people at work, what laws will protect you or your loved one, or how to afford treatment if you are not able to work. There are people, such as an oncology social worker or your company’s human resources manager, who can help you address these concerns and make a plan that works for you. There are also many resources that can help you think about the steps you can take to address these concerns.

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.

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