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On treatment for stomach cancer: My House

How can I cope with changes to my body and my emotions?

It is common to notice changes not only in how you look but in how you feel. And these changes may be different each day. Some days you may feel tired or hungry. And other days you may have a lot of energy or not feel like eating at all. Your healthcare team can help you learn to cope with these different feelings and changes. Ask a member of your team to refer you to a person or resources who can help.

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.


Where can I find financial help?

Many cancer treatments are expensive and may not be covered by insurance. But there are resources and organizations that can help keep financial issues from getting in the way of your treatment. Ask your healthcare team for information about reimbursement services, patient assistance programs, and programs offered by the companies that make cancer treatments.

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.


Can eating healthfully and being active help me feel better?

Eating healthy foods and being active may help lessen some of the physical and emotional effects of cancer treatment. For example, eating enough protein can help you fight infection and give you more energy. And being active can help you deal with stress and keep you strong. Always talk with your healthcare team about any changes to your eating habits or how active you are.

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.


How can I better cope with the physical changes caused by my cancer treatment?

Some cancer treatments may cause changes to the way you look. It may help to find a support group of people who have also had these changes. They may be able to offer tips on ways to cope with these changes. Members of your healthcare team may also be able to help.

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.


How can I help my loved one through treatment?

As a care partner, you may find it hard to watch a loved one go through the changes he or she is having. But there are things you can do to help:

  • Offer to go with your loved one to shop for new clothes. Be honest but sensitive
  • Know that is it okay if there are times when your loved one doesn't want to talk, but let him or her know you are there to listen
  • Ask what daily task she least enjoys doing, and offer to do it for him or her

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.


How can I, or the person I care about, eat well during treatment?

Eating well during treatment is very important. It can help you or the person you care about feel better before, during, and after treatment. But making healthy food choices can be hard during treatment for many reasons. This may be especially true for people with cancers of the digestive system, such as pancreatic, colon, or stomach cancer. For these types of cancer, surgery may be needed that may affect how you eat or drink. Other treatments, such as chemotherapy, can also have side effects that may cause eating or GI (gastrointestinal) problems. Your healthcare provider can refer you to resources and people, such as an oncology dietitian, that can help you learn tips for healthy eating during treatment. He or she can also help you make a meal plan that works for you.

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.


What do I need to think about when working during treatment?

Working during cancer treatment is a personal choice. You may find that what and how much you do may need to change based on how you feel. You may be wondering about many things, such as how to tell people at work, what laws will protect you or your loved one, or how to afford treatment if you are not able to work. There are people, such as an oncology social worker or your company’s human resources manager, who can help you address these concerns and make a plan that works for you. There are also many resources that can help you think about the steps you can take to address these concerns.

To the right are examples of organizations and resources you may find helpful. Click on the links to visit those websites and learn more.

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